Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children

At this site in 1881, Abby Munro, a Quaker from Philadelphia, established a home for orphans, neglected, and destitute children. Funds to purchase and operate the home were solicited locally and from friends in the North. It was incorporated in 1883 and is believed to have been the first orphanage for colored children in the State. Room and board cost approximately one dollar a week per child. The children were taught to cook, wash, iron, knit, sew, mend clothes, and all the duties of a household. The older children attended school regularly and made commendable progress in their studies. The orphanage operated here until the building was destroyed by fire in 1920.

Images

Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children, circa 1900

Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children, circa 1900

Abby D. Munro papers (1869-1926) Courtesy of University of South Carolina Library View File Details Page

Teacher with guitar, circa 1900

Teacher with guitar, circa 1900

Abby D. Munro papers (1869-1926) Courtesy of University of South Carolina Library View File Details Page

Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children, circa 1900

Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children, circa 1900

Abby D. Munro papers (1869-1926) Courtesy of University of South Carolina Library View File Details Page

Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children, circa 1900

Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children, circa 1900

Abby D. Munro papers (1869-1926) Courtesy of University of South Carolina Library View File Details Page

1893 Sanborn map showing orphange at Venning and Bennett

1893 Sanborn map showing orphange at Venning and Bennett

Courtesy of University of South Carolina Libray View File Details Page

1912 Sanborn map showing orphanage on corner of Venning and Bennett

1912 Sanborn map showing orphanage on corner of Venning and Bennett

Courtesy of University of South Carolina Library View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Town of Mount Pleasant Historical Commission, “Mount Pleasant Home for Destitute Children,” Mount Pleasant Historical, accessed February 20, 2017, http://mountpleasanthistorical.org/items/show/38.

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